Huffington Post on Facebook Scams


Facebook recently launched a new security wall to block scammers, but many are worried these measures won’t stop spam from spreading and that determined con artists will simply find new ways to get at unsuspecting users.

We’ve all seen suspicious posts on Facebook–a friend’s curiously impersonal message that’s riddled with odd typos, the irresistible app offering a chance to see who has viewed your profile, and more. These scams are sometimes obvious and easy to avoid, other times nefarious and simple to fall for. Despite Facebook’s security features, safe social networking rests in the user’s own hands.

Read the rest of the article here >>>

Scam Alert: MICROSOFT SERVICE DEPARTMENT – TELEPHONE CALL SCAM


My good friend John Veitch of Open Future, alerted us of the following scam that has been doing the rounds, apparently also in Christchurch. With businesses trying to recover and set up again the last thing you’d want to happen to you. At the same time if there is ever a time when this may sound plausible it is right now, and in all the recovery hectics you may just be a bit less on guard than in your usual state of being. So BE ALERTED AND DO NOT FALL FOR IT.

Microsoft Service Department – Telephone Call Scam

This is the third time I’ve been called. I didn’t hang up early this time, I tried to find out more about what was happening. Here’s the routine.

A Indian sounding voice claims that we are representing the “Microsoft Service Department”

I asked for some way to verify that, ad I was offered this phone number. (09 951 8119)

Then someone tried to explain the purpose of the call. When I asked questions I was passed to someone else (That happened three times.)

Here’s what the want you to do.

Open the Start Menu
Right Click “My Computer”
Right Click “Manage”
Under system tools double click “Event Viewer”

Open either
Application
or System

They tried to tell me that items marked with the red x were corrupted software.
The yellow triangles were virus infections
The blue I indicated junk files.

They asked me to go to
Start and open the RUN command box.
http://www.support.me

That brings up a page that apparently allows remote online support.

Then they ask me to enter my “6 digit warranty code”.
“Do you remember that code sir?”

They tell me it’s the last six digits of the Windows Product number for my machine.
76xxx-OEM-00xxxxxxxx1-51349 for me so they wanted 151349

I stopped them at that point.

Later I discover some videos about this scam. This is one of the better ones.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MuCFlR-YNdc&feature=related

For the sake of completeness here is the video.

Do not be fooled and thanks John.